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CUMBERLAND RIVER

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THE NASHVILLE CRAYFISH

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MAY 1, 1996

L.A.W.

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ARTS & MUSIC

 

 

Tom Mason and the Blue Buccaneers- www.tommason.net

Hank III- Headed To The Mountain

Hank Williams Jr. - Kiss Mother Nature Goodbye

John Hartford- Slumberlin on the Cumberland       http://youtu.be/aICsD4C-pC8

Ellis Kell- www.rivermusicexperience.org Listen, Learn, Play.

Jimmy Buffett- High Cumberland Jubilee

Dale Ann Bradley- Cumberland River Dreams

The Toadies- I Come From The Water

NATURE: John Denver - River Roll On

Bill Monroe- "Baptize Me in the Cumberland River"

 

 

Cinema

Eddie Reasoner- "Once Upon a River" a documentry of the Cumberland

River of Song the Mississippi

Art

Rachael McCampbell Endangered Heritage: Nature in the Balance

 

Welcome to the Civil War Art Collector

Studio Willingham By Barbara Willingham Hill. Paintings of the Cumberland Valley in Southeastern Kentucky

 

                      RIVERS & SPIRES CLARKSVILLE TENNESSEE APRIL 15-17 2010

Rachael McCampbell Endangered

Heritage Art Exhibition Mar 21-Apr 25 2009

 BOOKS

Kim Trevathan - Coldhearted River: A Canoe Odyssey Down The Cumberland

http://www.borders.com/online/store/TitleDetail?sku=1572335300

AN EXERT FROM COLDHEARTED RIVER:

Consulting a variety of maps, I wrote out an itinerary based upon an average

of a twenty-mile day, planning stops, when possible, at official campsites

and what I thought were likely places for primitive sites, such as an island, a

town, or the confluence of a major tributary. With the bits of knowledge I

collected in my scouting and reading, I found that segments of the river, particularly

in the upper region, still held quite a bit of mystery and uncertainty,

even for those who lived nearby. One man, Vic Scoggin, who had swum the

length of the river in 1996, gave me the most reliable and cautionary information,

but even he didnít have all the answers, even he acknowledged that

things happen on a river that resist explanation and light-of-day description.

I didnít want all the answers. I wanted to leave much of the river a mystery

so I could experience its surprises firsthand.

Working rivers like the Cumberland and the Tennessee are the last back

roads, the few places left in America where mysteries remain deep in the

night, in the early mornings, sometimes surprising you in the midday glare.

They wind far away from strip malls and four-lanes into lives that have

retained distinction, originality, and character. Canoeing, you set your own

pace and rest assured that no matter how much concrete is poured, no matter

how many trees are cut, no matter how much riprap smothers the banks,

humanity will never succeed in obliterating a river. Rivers will endure forever,

and in canoeing them, you become a part of their immortality.

KIM TREVATHAN