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ANCIENT SITES CONSERVANCY

 

 

Mark Tolley President Ancient Sites Conservancy email tolleymm@yahoo.com

The Tennessee Ancient Sites Conservancy (the "TASC") was organized in 2001 and formed in response to the need to preserve the state's cultural resources as epitomized by the ancient sites of the southern Indian people. TASC seeks both to protect these sites and educate the public about the ancient history that exists in many of our own backyards. The objectives of the TASC include preserving and protecting ancient / sacred sites in Tennessee and related cultural features of said sites by purchase, donation, or conservation easement, to increase public awareness of the ancient indigenous people and their cultures, and to be advocates for the above cited goals. Having Native Americans in its membership enables TASC to build bridges of understanding of this subject to all interested parties. TASC has 501(c)(3) tax exempt status with the IRS, and all donations are tax deductible.[

Join yahoo club for ASC>>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TennesseeAncientSites

 

Members and supporters of Ancient Sites Conservancy. Note the late Ms. Marion Dunn, front, second from left, and Mark Tolly president and founder ASC far right. Photo taken at Mound Bottom; main temple mound in background.

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20120222/WILLIAMSON0701/302220033/Westhaven-2-000-year-old-mounds-reveal-community-s-Native-American-past

http://www.moccasinbend.net/cita/chickamaugamound/index.html

 

Native American Pyramid Sits Hidden
Archaeologist: State Looks To Provide More Access To Historic Sites
Reported By Dennis Ferrier

POSTED: 4:50 pm CST February 29, 2008
UPDATED: 1:36 pm CST March 1, 2008
PEGRAM, Tenn. -- A little-know Native American pyramid has some
questioning the state's role in preserving and showcasing Tennessee's
history.


Channel 4 got a glimpse of the historic site on Friday.

"It was a fabulous site. We're looking at a city on celebration days,
equinox days, that there could have been 5,000 to 8,000 Native Americans
here from all over the area," said Mark Tolley of the Ancient Sites
Conservancy.

For 500 years, the site was one of the most important ancient Native
American villages in Tennessee.

"The big temple mound is a four-sided truncated pyramid. That means it's
flat on the top, and there was a structure there," said Tolley.

At the top of the pyramid there is a 1,000-year-old petroglyph etched into
the stone.

"This is a carving of a ceremonial mace. This was the symbol of the power
of the ruler," said Tolley.

In just the past decade, the state of Tennessee has bought and saved
several ancient Native American sites, but this site was purchased more
than 30 years ago.

The state has all these wonderful sites, but some members of the public
wonder when the average resident will get access.

"Some of it comes down just to political will. Saving the site and keeping
it intact for perpetuity is great, but opening it up to proper public
access, I think, is paramount," said Tolley.

State archaeologist Mike Moore said Tennessee is making all of the
purchased sites more accessible, but in a low-key, thoughtful way.

He said it is very easy to destroy these treasures, but the state said
there are more tours, parking and plans for all of the Native American
sites.

Those interested in the preservation efforts of the Ancient Sites
Conservancy can e-mail Tolley at tolleymm@yahoo.com

Best,

Matthew

Matthew Gilmore
vp-net@mail.h-net.msu.edu

 

ASC cleaned up two mounds along Hwy. 96 in Williamson Co. Everything was ground up and dispersed on site according to native law.